Adjusting to the Journey

I’ve spent the summer trying to find my “sea legs” in regard to my writing. You see, for the past ten years it has been on the periphery. Not that I didn’t work on it. I did. More and more in the past few years. But never before have I had to work on it. If things got crazy around my house, I’d just set writing aside for a little bit—or at least I wouldn’t stress over how little I managed to do.

With a contract, things change. Not that my family isn’t supportive. They are. But finding our collective “sea legs” is taking some time, too. That could be because this summer was unlike any we’ve ever had, all going in different directions and being gone more than we were home. But whatever the case, it doesn’t negate the fact that we must all adjust our thoughts and our actions to this new way of life.
For me, part of it is a scheduling issue, trying to carve out the needed hours to do what must be done. But part of it is a writing issue. I have a short summary I wrote for the 2nd contracted book, but now I have to flesh it out into a whole novel. I don’t usually do those kinds of things before I start writing! And yet I know I must, for the clock is ticking toward the deadline and I don’t have time to start and stop over again and again like I have in the past.
So if you think about it, please pray for me—for us—as I find my “sea legs” for this new journey. I know they’ll come. The knees are getting less wobbly already. But the time has come when I need to stand strong and firm and move forward in spite of the unfamiliar rocking of the boat on the waves. 

4 comments on “Adjusting to the Journey

  1. Thanks, Jillian! I'm so glad we are making this journey at the same time so we can help each other!

  2. Hi Anne,
    I understand those wobbly sea legs completely. In fact, I think I went into some kind of shock after I signed my contract in March.

    You said: "And yet I know I must, for the clock is ticking toward the deadline and I don’t have time to start and stop over again and again like I have in the past."

    I've found that ticking clock is a constant reminder to stay on track and if we stay in the story we'll be okay.

    There is an adjustment period, I know I'm still in it, but as Richard said, it's a good problem. Let's wrestle that problem to the ground together.

  3. Ah, but it's a good problem, isn't it? You'll make it. And we're behind you all the way.

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